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Balat

B intro

 

Hoş geldiniz! Welcome to Istanbul. A sprawling metropolis of 13+ million and the only city in the world to have one Turkish slippered foot in Europe and the other in Asia.

As the song goes, Istanbul was Constantinople, now it’s Istanbul, not Constantinople. In actual fact, the history is way more complicated than that, with a zillion name changes just to keep things interesting. Definitely not something I can do justice to here. But in warp speed it goes something like this: began as Greek in 7th century BC (Byzantium), then Roman (Constantinople), then Ottoman in the 15th century (Istanbul) and finally became a Republic in 1923.

I’ve been to Istanbul twice before. But only as a typical tourist, visiting the usual suspects in the tourist precinct of Sultanahmet – Topkapi Palace, the Blue Mosque, Basilica Cistern and Haghia Sophia. They are all insanely good – and I don’t usually warm to the big stuff – but that’s really all I knew about the place.

What was Istanbul like beyond the postcard cliches I wondered? And so here we are.

The suburb I’ve chosen for week one is Balat, recommended to me by a 52 Suburbs follower who knows Istanbul intimately (thanks Angelo). Well, Balat and neighbouring Fener actually. It’s hard to know when you leave one and enter the other. And their tales are so similar; both populated by non-Muslims and filled with fine mansions once upon a time, but now poor-ish and run-down with many buildings close to ruin.

On the map they’re located on the European side, alongside the Golden Horn. While they’re actually not that far from scrubbed up Sultanahmet, they are rarely visited. My kind of place! Let’s go Balat and Fener…

 

Part 1: What happens when you wander without a map

So as I said, way back the area was largely non-Muslim – Greek, Armenian, Jewish. Hence the presence of churches and synagogues, including the big cheese of the Greek Orthodox Christians, the Greek Orthodox Patriarchate in Fener. While trying to find said church, Coco (yes, she’s back out ‘blogging’) and I got a little lost and stumbled across two beautiful mosques, the Sultan Selim Camii and the Fatih Camii.

Head spins all round really. Given this city’s history, I think it’s going to be hard to avoid amazing monuments even when trying to.

 

beret and domes

beret and domes

 

 

 

and then the sun came out

and then the sun came out

 

 

 

down the hill to the Golden Horn

down the hill to the Golden Horn

 

 

 

the call to food

the call to food

 

 

 

Realising, eventually, that we’d strayed out of Fener and Balat, we made our way down the hill, through a very conservative Muslim area. Most people refused my camera but luckily a few obliged…

 

protected by the Evil Eye

protected by the Evil Eye

 

 

 

flower power

flower power

 

 

 

eyes the colour of the Sea of Mamara

eyes the colour of the Sea of Mamara

 

 

 

Ali

Ali

 

 

 

mates

mates

 

 

 

Finally we found the Greek church. (Note to self: map. Getting lost is good but not when it’s two degrees and your young companion is hungry/thirsty/tired.)

 

the Greeks were here first

the Greeks were here first

 

 

 

the church and the mosque

the church and the mosque

 

 

 

On the way to the church we passed by a hill-top Greek school that was on my list – even I couldn’t miss it given its size and colour.

 

the Greek school at the top of the hill

the Greek school at the top of the hill

 

 

 

Part 2: A neighbourhood under threat

As impressive as the mosques, church and school were, I was more interested in finding some of the old mansions and homes I’d read about.

While we couldn’t find any ‘mansions’ as such, we did see endless examples of the typical Fener-Balat house – colourful with a bay window out front. While some of them have been well cared for, many are struggling to survive with a number of them close to ruin.

 

looking out her window

looking out her window

 

 

 

one abandoned, one just hanging on

one abandoned, one just hanging on

 

 

 

art imitates life :: 1

fantasy and reality :: 1

 

 

 

art imitates life :: 2

fantasy and reality :: 2

 

 

 

Close to the Greek church, we found a small shop selling ceramic models of the Fener-Balat houses, pre-dilapidation. I so wanted to quiz the woman inside about the history of the houses but we couldn’t communicate at all. The only thing I could understand was that the yellow model was a mini version of the house directly next door.

 

memories

a colourful past

 

 

 

well kept

well kept

 

 

 

some things never change

some things never change :: 1

 

 

 

some things never change :: 2

some things never change :: 2

 

 

 

curtains, out and in

curtains, out and in

 

 

 

On day two, I noticed a woman wearing flash gloves and a fur collared coat striding down a street in Balat. Selva, it turns out, is an architect who works in the area with her architect husband, Halim. Coco and I met them later at their office, a renovated stable, where I learned the reason why many of the houses in Fener particularly have been left to rot – around the 1950s many of the Greeks were expelled from the area, leaving their homes as they stood on the day. Unable to be sold to anyone else, they remain abandoned and unloved.

Halim and Selva explained that they are trying to revitalise some of the buildings but are constantly hampered by the ownership issues. But that there is hope – some of the homes are being restored and the area is gradually changing, with artists and small businesses moving in.

 

a couple of architects and the architect couple, Halim and Selva

a couple of architects and the architect couple, Halim and Selva

 

 

 

old and new :: 1

restoration and new life

 

 

 

old and new :: 2

old and new

 

 

 

One of the new arrivals we found was a shoe and design business run by three women, again close to the Greek church.

 

neighbours - the Greek Church and the trendy shoe shop

neighbours - the Greek church and the trendy shoe shop

 

 

 

sweet shoes

patterned

 

 

 

walking past the shoe shop on the way to the mosque

walking past the shoe shop on the way to the mosque

 

 

 

S is for circle

S is for circle

 

 

 

who will save Fener and Balat? the architects?

who will save Fener and Balat? the architects?

 

 

 

Part 3: Eat, drink

The staples of Turkish life – round simit bread, strong black tea and sweet treats – are all in abundance on the streets of Balat and Fener.

 

been around forever

been around forever

 

 

 

rising heavenwards

rising heavenwards

 

 

 

religions

religions

 

 

 

There wasn’t much in the way of old charm in the shops of Balat with one lovely exception. Merkez Sekercisi, a 134 year old sweet and cake shop right across the lane from the architects’ office. Halim translated my questions to the owner, Mustafa, who explained that he inherited the shop from his grandfather and has been working here ever since he was a young boy, some 50 odd years.

Forget the historic mosques, churches or charming houses – the lolly shop was the highlight for Coco.

 

Mustafa and the 134 year old sweet shop

Mustafa in front of Merkez Sekercisi

 

 

 

the grandfather and Mustafa

the grandfather and Mustafa

 

 

 

baked fresh today in the 134 year old sweet shop

baked fresh today in the 134 year old sweet shop

 

 

 

just one more Turkish Delight please!

just one more Turkish Delight please!

 

 

 

Aside from Mustafa’s sweet shop, there were a handful of coffee houses or kahvehane, all of them the domain of men.

 

 

 

out for coffee

out for coffee

 

 

 

secret men's business at the local kahvehane

secret men's business at the local kahvehane

 

 

 

And of course fish. Lots of fish.

 

 

 

silvery fish from the Golden Horn

silvery fish from the Golden Horn

 

 

 

Part 4: Walls and windows

Random beauty in the walls, windows and doors of Balat and Fener.

 

local colour

local colour

 

 

 

window decorations

window decorations

 

 

 

green and blue, colours of the sea

green and blue, colours of the sea

 

 

 

long bread loaves

long bread loaves

 

 

 

ancient Turks worshipped the moon and sky

ancient Turks worshipped the moon and sky

 

 

 

The Wrap

If you squint hard you can imagine what Fener and Balat might have looked and felt like in their heyday. But despite the dilapidation, there’s still so much beauty in the area – the steep hills with colourful houses climbing up them, the impressive churches and mosques, and those ingenious washing lines that stretch across the streets. Quite what happens if you fall out with your neighbour I’ll never know – but I’d sure like to find out.

 

 

may the future be bright

may the future be happy

 

 

 

On the ‘home front’

 

rain rain go away

rain rain go away

 

 

 

Coco sees snow for the first time

Coco sees snow for the first time

 

As you may have noticed this post is a few days late. Why? Rain and snow. Or was it sleet? Not sure but whatever it was, it melted as soon as you looked at it and far from being picturesque just made getting around slippery and annoying. Grumble, grumble. Still, Coco had her first viewing of the white stuff and it was kind of novel.

Other news on the home front? We’re happily parked in a cosy little apartment I’ve rented for the month through Airbnb and I’m back on deck, big time. Mum, cook, cleaner, photographer, blogger and whoa, home schooler. Not sure if I’m cut out for that last one. Actually, no, that’s a lie. I’m positively, absolutely sure I’m not cut out for it. Given the weather challenges, the moment I see sunlight break through the grey I want to be out, snapping – not in, trying to explain equivalent fractions, snapping.

But there it is. It was my choice to take my child out of a perfectly good school so I could explore the globe. I’ve given myself a good talking to and hopefully from now on my attitude will improve. Depending on how things go I may even give myself a gold star.

This suburb was brought to you by Adelaide Perry Gallery, Presbyterian Ladies’ College, Sydney

See you next week, and if the rain and ‘snow’ hold off, on time.

 

  1. Brent Wilson says:

    Amazing! Another great part of the journey! Love the pigeon image and the eyes the colour of the sea. Home schooling are you kidding! Stop it now! What Coco is learning being with you in exotic locations will far out strip anything she would be subjected to in a classroom!

  2. Stephen says:

    The journey just gets better and better!

  3. Debbie qadri says:

    No keep up the home schooling. I took my kids travelling for three months, didn’t school then and they found it very difficult to catch up with some things. My daughter still blames the trip for not knowing her times tables. But thanked me for it, for what she learnt about the real world

  4. Sahar says:

    I was waiting this trip for too long!
    I love this country and love your work, and wanted to see the creative contribution..and yeah this is exactly what I wanted to see :)
    did you enjoy it, and how it feels being in multi-religious country?

  5. Fay Thomson says:

    I have just at last taken time to look at this site. A good way to learn about other parts of the world. On your travels you just might photograph something that could be submitted to the competition/project ART TOPPLING tobacco. Kind Regards
    http://www.arttopplingtobacco.com.au

  6. Di says:

    Gold star anyway Lou!! You have made me so intrigued about Istanbul. That girl ‘Sea of Mamara’ is beautiful, and so are all your shots, as usual.
    Agree re the above post, who cares about fractions, maybe you could use something interesting to explain equivalent fractions (whatever they are!!).
    Enjoy the next 3 weeks.
    Di x

  7. Di says:

    PS. Hope you bought one of those cute houses as a memento.

  8. Wendy Wyatt says:

    Louise, I love this blog; I think its my favourite so far. I feel privileged to be able to read and see what your are experienced and to share these fantastic images.

  9. Ngaire Astridge says:

    Absolutely gorgeous images. You make me want to explore than hidden gems in my city with my camera. Absolutely agree…the experience you are giving Coco is one she will treasure her whole life! Safe travels and we look forward to your next installment!

  10. Kate C. says:

    May the future be happy! It certainly will be with you in our world Louise. Thank you for the beautiful imagines. I am craving some turkish delight now…
    Kx

  11. Anna says:

    Wow, wow, wow once again Louise. Thank you for taking us through the streets of Balat and Fener – just wonderful. As for Miss Coco – I’m with Brent, let her savour and enjoy the School of Life, one suburb at a time.

  12. Mark Maughan says:

    Thanks for your very entertaining and informative blog. My partner & I have booked to go to Istanbul for a few days this coming July. I was intrigued after reading Doug Saunder’s Arrival City where he describes Istanbul as a positive example of rural to urban migration. The Gecekondus are the result.

  13. Leonie Brennan says:

    My husband has always raved about his visit to Istanbul back in the 70s … I love the Iznik Pottery and one day hope to see it! You haven’t lost your touch for telling a story with the images you create with your lens! Enjoy!

  14. Tatyana says:

    Awesome shots, just awesome. And again, great captions;-) Personally I’ve never wanted to visit Turkey. Until now. Keep doing your magic, Louise!:-)

  15. Gill says:

    wonderful colours and great combinations – again! now I want to go to Istanbul and soak up some of that atmosphere. These tourism bureaus should have you on board!

  16. Wayne says:

    The images are so are wonderful. i must get back on o few. the cold is a terror there. We will have spring time here in Sydney Australia. So much rain… the watertank is full!

  17. Michelle says:

    don’t be silly. istanbul would be gorgeous in the rain/snow/sleet. i think you should still visit the usual suspects as there will be less crowds and you might capture unique angles of the “mundane”. and think of dramatic shots you would get in that “gloomy” weather. keep up the great work louise!

  18. Sean says:

    Love Istanbul and we never visited these areas, you did a great job of drawing me in to this area! Your images are stunning and the portrait of Ali is superb! Good luck with the home schooling, any way of incorporating fractions with f stops and the correct exposure triangle :)

  19. Louise says:

    Hi all
    So glad you enjoyed this first post from Istanbul. This is definitely a city you could fall in love with. It’s ‘easy exoticism’ thanks to the fact it straddles Europe and Asia, both geographically and culturally – old eastern Orientalism combined with new western cosmopolitan. So you get that hit of exotic without the maddening crowds or the dust and dirt factor.

    And thanks for the encouragement re-Coco’s home schooling. My new plan is to take the work and do it in cafes etc. Fractions with coffee, much better!

  20. Wayne says:

    Wonderful Louise. Coco reminds me of an icon in that pic… Our Lady of the Snows.
    Keep warm.

  21. Kate says:

    Absolutely beautiful – the light is incredible! Brought tears to my eyes

  22. David says:

    Go Louise….all looking beautiful. Looks like you’ve got enough for a book already! Airbnb is fantastic isn’t it!

  23. JENNY says:

    A place I’ve never visited but it looks amazing with your colourful photos – thank you and enjoy your next destination!

  24. Anna says:

    “I have never let my schooling interfere with my education” – Mark Twain

  25. Ellen says:

    Great well u havent mussed much here been rain n floods galore good ole waragambas flooded first time in my 26yr old memory lol hope ya havin fun

  26. Robert says:

    Louise, I’ve yet to see a better “Tourist Promo” for Istanbul than this weeks. You do it justice.
    Your Blog is a welcome relief from the avalanche of politics in Australia each day. Far too much misogynistic rubbish, particularly as we have a woman PM. You both have “class’, IMHO.
    Looking forward to some of the “hidden” istanbul in the next 3 weeks.

  27. Louise says:

    Wayne – She does somewhat. Very saintly my child.
    Kate – There is some lovely light here. So glad it moved you.
    David – Airbnb is a boon for those, like me, wanting to avoid hotel room prices and touristy locations.
    Anna – Ha! Agree with you Mr Twain but not sure if Coco will upon her return to school next year if she struggles with that delightful thing called maths.
    Ellen – Lovely to see your name! Welcome back.
    Robert – Sounds like I’m not missing much on both counts – weather and politics.

    BTW, this week’s post is dragging its heels too – will probably be on Monday instead of the usual Friday.

  28. nicole says:

    Oh Yay! I so badly want to go to Istanbul. You probably won’t visit Beyoğlu as I think it’s quite touristy but I’ve been reading about the 19th century arcades there for my thesis. So I’m very excited that your Istanbul posts are happening at the same time I’m reading all about another aspect of the city. Beautifu beautiful images as always :-)

  29. gaygay says:

    Following every step Louise…..every pic a revelation.
    Great escape from nurse Nightengale duties here!
    Doing well. GG

  30. Natalie says:

    Hi Louise, Lovely post. I went to Istanbul in 2010 summer and got lost in a similar looking area called Cihangir (I think) just down from Taksim Square. The area had a similar vibe to Double Bay with it’s tall narrow houses and steep streets and stunning water views. My photos weren’t as good as yours though!

    • Louise says:

      Natalie – That’s so weird – I just hit publish on my next suburb in Istanbul. Cihangir! Only I reckon it’s more Potts Point mixed with Newtown than Double Bay. And while steep with water views, I think it’s very different to last week’s ‘living museum’ suburb, Balat. Cihangir is hipsterville, Turkish style!

  31. Frederick Hepworth says:

    Enjoyed 52 Suburbs. Currently enjoying 52 Sub’s Around the World. You have certainly refreshed Oz photography. Hope you & Coco keep well.

  32. Amalia says:

    fantastic Louise !….enjoying the way you are capturing the culture and some unexpected delights along the way… I look forward to the post to follow. take care !

  33. Angelo says:

    Hi Louise here’s that article I found:

    http://www.hurriyetdailynews.com/balat-gets-reprieve-on-renewal-plan.aspx?pageID=238&nID=23752&NewsCatID=339

    It would be a shame if the area were to be destroyed in the name of urban “renewal”, especially given that it symbolises in many ways the complex and multifaceted history of Istanbul as a whole. It would be a loss especially for anyone interested in the Greek heritage of Istanbul.

    • Louise says:

      Angelo, that’s such good news that Balat has been given a reprieve. I hope it’s one that lasts forever.

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