34

Bedford-Stuyvesant

BS intro

 

Remember that Billy Joel song from 1980, ‘You may be right, I may be crazy’? To illustrate his being a “lunatic” he sang that he was so crazy he even “walked through Bedford Stuy alone”.

Well, that was over 30 years ago so I assumed, as Coco and I set out to have our own walk around the Brooklyn neighbourhood of Bedford-Stuyvesant – or Bed-Stuy – that things had changed.

My assumption was correct. It’s no longer ‘do or die Bed-Stuy’, famous for crack and crime, but an ‘up and coming’ area attracting a middle class who like the strong community feel – and no doubt the fact that you can rent or buy a beautiful old brownstone here for way less than neighbouring Park Slope.

Before we wander, a quick history… Started out as the village of Bedford, meaning “place where the wise old men meet”. Expanded to include an area called Stuyvesant Heights and the two joined to become Bedford-Stuyvesant. In the 1900s African-Americans migrated here from the South followed by West African and Caribbean immigrants. Long been a centre of black culture – music, art and film (Spike Lee shot various flicks here, including ‘Do the Right Thing’) as well as being active in fighting for equal rights.

Let’s walk…

 

Part 1: Place of artists and where old men meet

Bed-Stuy may not be as dodgy as it once was but apparently it still isn’t all roses; a 2011 article I read proclaimed that the area still had a highish murder rate and a bad drug trafficking problem. “Best”, it said, “to avoid wandering aimlessly through the neighborhood.”

But aimlessly wander we did. Not down the street a kindly shop owner told us to “steer clear of” – the one with the temporary police tower on the side of the road. But everywhere else across the sprawling neighbourhood.

Didn’t set eyes on a single murderer or drug trafficker. Instead we met perhaps the friendliest community of people we’ve met so far in NY. From singers and wanabee singers to old men chewing the fat…

 

 

'my name is Popula, I'm a rap artist'

‘my name is Popula, I’m a rap artist’

 

 

 

 

soon Popula was so popular they came running to see him from all over the planet

soon Popula was so popular they came running to see him from all over the planet

 

 

 

 

singer Jon E Kash - "my religion? love"

singer Jon E Kash – “my religion? love”

 

 

 

 

in good company - visual artist, Jeyfree

in good company – visual artist, Jeyfree

 

 

 

 

wanabee artist, Princess - 'I want to be a dancer, actress and singer'

wanabee artist, Princess – ‘I want to be a dancer, actress and singer’

 

 

 

 

'place where the wise old men meet'

‘place where the wise old men meet’

 

 

 

 

chewing the fat, kerbside - Eddie's Oldsmobile

chewing the fat, kerbside – Eddie’s Oldsmobile

 

 

 

 

the cap brigade - Henry, Eddie, Jeff and friends

the cap brigade – Henry, Eddie, Jeff and friends

 

 

 

 

Part 2: Equal, sort of

On one of our visits to Bed-Stuy we stumbled on a family birthday party for nine year old Arkeen. While Coco busied herself in a game with some of the girls I got chatting to one of the mums, Sa’uda – and somehow we started talking about the issue of racism.

Her grand-mother, who was inside the house with the other family members, had come to the neighbourhood in 1963 as part of the ‘Great Migration’ from South Carolina to escape the segregation and racism down there.

So did racism still exist, almost 50 years later and in enlightened NYC, I asked Sa’uda?

Sa’uda, who works in mental health, told me about the recent case of a 12 year old African-American boy who was innocently mucking around in a junk yard when he was shoved against a wall, hand-cuffed and taken into custody. There were no charges but as a result of the trauma he ended up in a psych unit for a few weeks. He’s only just started to be able to go outside again and still he can’t look at a police officer without breaking into a sweat.

In the South, Sa’uda explained, the segregation is obvious. In NY, it’s not – but yes, it still exists. She told me that mums of black boys have to educate their sons at a fairly young age about the way things are – that they have to behave in a certain way to protect themselves against the racism as best they can.

The congregation from the Seventh Day Adventist Church we met when we explored Crown Heights had all said similar things. But still it shocked me – yes, in the South I’d expect it but in NYC in 2012?

But things were improving, Sa’uda said. Nowadays most of the kids have good self-esteem and question the way things are rather than just accept.

 

 

cousins - Arkeen's birthday party

cousins – Arkeen’s birthday party

 

 

 

 

sadly for kids like Amir, 49 years later it's still a dream

sadly for kids like Khayr, 49 years later it’s still a dream

 

 

 

 

being black and white in Bed Stuy - activisim vs renovation

being black and white in Bed Stuy – activism vs renovation

 

 

 

 

there are unequl suspenstion rates in schools- 'racism still exists'

there are unequal suspension rates in schools- ‘racism still exists’

 

 

 

 

he ever have true freedom?

will he ever have true freedom?

 

 

 

 

Sa’uda struck me as hope personified. She grew up in hard-core East New York, not far from Bed-Stuy. But she took herself off to college on the Upper East Side, a place that many living in her neighbourhood at the time didn’t even know existed. Now she is passing on her positive attitudes to her own children as well as helping kids like the 12 year old – surely with every generation things will improve?

 

 

 

hope

hope

 

 

 

 

Part 3: Cooking up a storm

Walking along Nostrand Avenue, one of the main streets in Bed-Stuy, we stumbled on a new cafe called Paris Dakar specialising in French crepes. Inside was Thierno, the owner and crepe chef. A quiet man, I only learned his story when his friendly assistant told us… Thierno arrived from Senegal 15 years ago speaking not one word of English. Just two months ago he opened his own cafe and it’s going gang-busters. He supports his immediate family who live here as well as his extended family back home – his mum, aunties etc. – and has done so ever since he arrived in NY. The American Dream come true?

 

 

Thierno, an angel to his family

Thierno, an angel to his family

 

 

 

 

working his way towards the American Dream, one crepe at a time

working his way towards the American Dream, one crepe at a time

 

 

 

 

On another visit we came across a very different scenario, but one that still involved food and commerce. Khem, originally from Jamaica, was smoking out half of Bed-Stuy with his jerk chicken that he sells for $15 a pop. But his neighbours didn’t mind one bit – because Khem’s jerk chicken is worth being smoked out for. I say this with certainty because he gave us a taste of his famous chook – damn fine.

The secret? The Pimento wood he uses to smoke the chicken that comes all the way from Jamaica, and of course his special, secret, magical ‘rub’ – the marinade.

 

 

just follow your nose to Khem's place

just follow your nose to Khem’s place

 

 

 

 

working his magic - Khem, the king of jerk chicken

working his magic – Khem and his cauldron of delight

 

 

 

 

'the secret ingredient is my rub not the beer' :: 1

‘the secret ingredient is my rub not the beer’ :: 1

 

 

 

 

'the secret ingredient is my rub not the beer' :: 2

‘the secret ingredient is my rub not the beer’ :: 2

 

 

 

 

From what I could gather Khem cooks sporadically. But he doesn’t need to tell his neighbours when his chickens are available – the smells wafting over the airwaves do that just fine. They come a-runnin’.

 

 

'my kids love Khem's chicken'- longtime fan and neighbour, Sandy

‘my kids love Khem’s chicken’- longtime fan and neighbour, Sandy

 

 

 

 

the hand of god

the hand of god

 

 

 

 

BBQs are clearly the go in Bed-Stuy. On another visit we met fellow BBQ-er, Kevin, whipping up some fish for he and his wife, Georgette, who was due home from work any time. There was so much fish on the grill I thought perhaps he was also running a side business like Khem, but no, they were just for he and his wife – “She’s a big eater”.

 

 

'that's a lot of fish for two people' - 'it's my wife, she eats a lot' - Kevin cooking for Georgette

‘that’s a lot of fish for two people’ – ‘it’s my wife, she eats a lot’

 

 

 

 

fish for dinner

smokin’

 

 

 

 

Georgette turned up while Kevin and I were chatting. Another incredibly friendly, warm Bed-Stuyer.

 

 

'So Georgette, what's the secret to happiness?' - 'think positive'

‘So Georgette, what’s the secret to happiness?’ – ‘think positive’

 

 

 

 

 Part 4: Sunday in Bed-Stuy

Which means one thing – church.

We stuck our heads into the loudest one going – Mount Sinai Cathedral, a Pentecostal church of God in Christ. AKA, loud and lively. I wasn’t allowed to photograph inside but the place was jumping with a full blown band going all out and people dancing behind their pews. I loved the atmosphere but Coco could only stand it for a minute – “Mum, I’m going outside, it’s a bit too loud and crazy for me.”

When I came back out I noticed one of the ushers, who help people to their seats, looking through the main doors. It was Flossie, a dedicated church member who first visited the church at 25 and is still there 50 years later. When I asked her, does her faith ever waiver, she replied, “Well, when I was younger it did but not anymore. Men don’t always treat you right but the Lord does, always.”

 

 

Flossie

Flossie

 

 

 

 

'men will let you down but the Lord will look after you, always'

‘men will let you down but the Lord will look after you, always’

 

 

 

 

Flossie outside her beloved church

Flossie outside her beloved church

 

 

 

 

We left Flossie to her faith and wandered around to see who else we could find.

 

 

the Americanisation of Africans as told by hats - from traditional to westernised

the Americanisation of Africans as told by hats – from traditional to westernised

 

 

 

 

and I pray that those women don't fall off their shoes

and I pray that those women don’t fall off their shoes

 

 

 

 

The Wrap

To be honest I was keen to explore Bed-Stuy because I’d heard that it had a lovely stock of beautiful brownstones in the section called the Stuyvesant Heights Historic District. But instead of just finding some nice old buildings I found the most amazing community. I swear everyone we walked past – black, white, young, old, professional, working class – they all said hi and smiled. If I had questions, they happily stopped to answer them.

Life may still not be perfect in Bed-Stuy, maybe far from it, but whatever happens they’re all in it together.

 

 

 

two 9 year old Cancerians who both love to dance - Coco and Princess

two 9 year old Cancerians who both love to dance – Coco and Princess

 

 

On the ‘home front’

My head has been swirling this week. I realised as much as I love NY, it’s not going to last us until the end of the project, which is another 18 installments (18!). But where to go? It does depend on budget but I’m thinking a few more North American cities (Chicago, Memphis, Miami) and maybe somewhere in South America (Mexico City or Buenos Aires). I’ve even put Tokyo or Osaka back on the table, having moved on a little from my former worries about the radiation threat.

Anything jump out at you? I was also thinking Hawaii – because all most people know about the place is that it has nice beaches. But then maybe that is all it has…

Anyway, at the same time as all that travelling around the place in my head, Coco and I have had to up sticks a few times this week, leaving our West Village apartment to stay with our lovely friend Chris on the Upper West Side via his gorgeous family in Brooklyn. We need to rest our heads in one place for at least a fortnight before we shuffle off again.

This suburb has been brought to you by Nicole Lenord and Derek Leddie

 —

See you next week.

 

33

Lower East Side

LES intro

 

After the highs of the last few neighbourhoods, I came down with a thud this week.

Zero energy and worse, zip curiosity – all my life I’ve been curious and keen to turn a corner, but suddenly I felt like all I wanted to see were the insides of my eyeballs.

Not surprising – we’ve been travelling for nine months without a break – but not helpful either.

So I decided to compromise. I’d take it easy and explore somewhere close.

We’re staying in an apartment in the West Village so close could mean a number of places. Definitely not the West Village though – it’s still charming but just not very interesting – but the Lower East Side, that could work. Manhattan may have lost its edge but as someone we met said, “Yeah, but we still got the Lower East Side”.

‘Suburb’ No 33 decided.

Some facts… The Lower East Side (LES) – which is the bit south of East Houston and north of East Broadway and Canal Street – is important historically because it was the first home immigrants knew, beginning with the Irish, Germans and East European Jews in the 1840s, to the Italians in the 1890s and then the Puerto Ricans and Dominicans in the 1940-50s. The latest waves have been the Chinese from 1965 and the hipsters more recently.

Let’s amble. Slowly if that’s alright with you.

 

Part 1: From the past to the present

As I mentioned, the LES is getting more hipsterish by the day. But was there more to it than just the cool cafes, boutiques and art galleries? Was there still a ‘neighbourhood’?

In the 1840s there definitely was a neighbourhood. But it was one that was filled with thousands of people per square mile, all desperately trying to pursue the ‘American Dream’ while crammed into dark, noisy, dirty tenement buildings without electricity, water or loos…

 

 

now there's AC but back then there wasn't even any electricity - or water or loos - in the tenements

now there’s AC but back then there wasn’t even any electricity – or water or loos – in the tenements

 

 

 

 

Ridley's was a big department store in the petticoat era

Ridley’s was a big department store in the petticoat era

 

 

 

 

Despite the bad conditions, Eastern European Jews in particular thrived in the LES. They lived in the tenements and set up shop down below, stitching and silversmithing their way to a better life. And in 1886 they put their stamp on the place forever by building a magnificent shul, the Eldridge Street Synagogue.

 

 

same vintage - the synagogue and the pushcarts

same vintage – the synagogue and the pushcarts

 

 

 

 

You’re seeing the Eldridge Street Synagogue at its best, at the end of a 20 year restoration. When I first laid eyes on it, I imagined how thrilled the local Jewish community must be, to have it as their shul. But when I visited it on Saturday, their day of prayer, I was stunned at how few were there – orthodox Jews still live on the LES but there are relatively few compared to 100 years ago.

 

 

Eldridge Street Synagogue, restored to its 1887 glory

Eldridge Street Synagogue, restored to its 1887 glory

 

 

 

 

Joseph, one of just a handful attending the synagogue

Joseph, one of just a handful attending the synagogue

 

 

 

 

John Safran's cousin?

John Safran’s cousin?

 

 

 

 

Part 2: Jewish life on the LES

Having discovered the Eldridge Street Synagogue I was keen to explore the rest of the Jewish LES. So I headed to Orchard Street, knowing that this was where many of the Eastern European Jewish immigrants had worked 14 hour days to buy small shops and establish the area as a bargain mecca.

Well, that was then and this was now – there’s hardly any more Jewish shops left on Orchard Street. I read later that as late as the 1960s, the eight blocks on Orchard Street between East Houston and Divsion Street were filled with Jewish owned shops, selling everything from fabrics to luggage.

Thankfully though the neighbourhood still has Samuel Gluck, owner of Global International Mens Clothiers. Business may not be brisk but Sam isn’t going down without a fight – in the short time we were there he corralled two guys who just happened to be walking by to slip on a jacket or two. This is a man who hustles while he waits.

 

 

one of the last - No 62 Orchard has been here almost 60 years

one of the last – No 62 Orchard has been here almost 60 years

 

 

 

 

Sam’s father arrived in NY in 1945 from Romania with nothing but managed to start up the business and thrive – so far it’s been going for almost 60 years. But the last decade especially has seen massive change in the area.

Given the changing population of the LES – from Orthodox Jews to hipsters and the Chinese – Sam is doing what he can to adapt.

 

 

'Now I tuck my curls behind my ears to blend in more'

‘I tuck my curls behind my ears to blend in more’

 

 

 

 

Hey Sam, I need a new suit for tonight, can you organise it?

Hey Sam, I need a new suit for tonight, can you organise it?

 

 

 

 

Leaving Sam to scout the street for more potential customers, I continued my search for other remnants of the Jewish LES. Not surprisingly, it’s the Jewish food businesses that are far from struggling – the Jewish like their nosh.

 

 

there were no sons

there were no sons

 

 

 

 

sacrosanct in Jewish life - bagels and the Torah

sacrosanct in Jewish life – bagels and the Torah

 

 

 

 

Still, they now have to compete with all the Chinese offerings.

 

 

knishes or noodles - take your pick

knishes or noodles?

 

 

 

 

But not with the ‘Cup & Saucer Luncheonette’ on Eldridge Street. This place is all but washed up.

 

 

the Cup & Saucer Luncheonette is all but washed up

the Cup & Saucer Luncheonette is all but washed up

 

 

 

 

Part 3: The Buddhists of the LES

I read that the Puerto Ricans and Dominicans are the latest immigrants to arrive in the LES. But I think maybe they must be in the East Village rather than the LES because I didn’t really notice them so much. To me the LES is really about the Jewish and the Chinese.

While most Chinese of course hang around in neighbouring Chinatown, they’ve also in recent years strayed into the LES. Eldridge Street, for example, where the Cup & Saucer Luncheonette is still hanging on for dear life, is now very Chinese – there’s a Buddhist ‘temple’ just one door down from the Eldridge Street Synagogue.

I only discovered this by stumbling on it after I’d left the synagogue that Saturday morning. From one lot of faithful to another, albeit a very different one.

 

 

the far East vs Eastern Europe - the Buddhist temple and the synagogue

the far East vs Eastern Europe – the Buddhist temple and the synagogue

 

 

 

 

the Buddhist abbot

the Buddhist abbot

 

 

 

 

honouring their ancestors

honouring their ancestors

 

 

 

 

men in robes

men in robes

 

 

 

 

I obviously tried the Abbot’s patience because a moment after I took the shot above he turned on his heel and went inside to get another Buddhist monk to come out and ‘heavy’ me. Very surreal, being eyeballed by a black African Buddhist who wasn’t having any of my backchat. He was right, I had stayed long enough, but still, it seemed so un-Buddhist.

 

 

swish

swish

 

 

 

 

Part 4: The Chinese

I find the mix of Jewish and Chinese in the LES particularly interesting – while they seem so different, they’ve both successfully transplanted their rich cultural practices all over the world.

 

 

the different faces of the LES - Jewish, Chinese, American

the different faces of the LES – Jewish, Chinese, American

 

 

 

 

foreign neighbours

foreign neighbours

 

 

 

 

Walking along Division Street, I noticed a woman burning a whole load of papers near a stool piled high with dumplings and incense. She was performing a ceremony to pay her respects to someone who died. It was right outside a shop where they were making those 3D paper models that we’d seen in Hong Kong that would later be burnt to ensure a good afterlife.

It didn’t matter that she wasn’t somewhere tranquil or grander than a street somewhere in NYC. This was her culture and she’d practice it wherever.

 

 

smoke and fire on the Lower East Side - paying respects

smoke and fire on the Lower East Side – paying respects

 

 

 

 

It was the same as the Jews – they’d transplanted their culture all the way from Eastern Europe to an entirely foreign land and made it work.

 

 

 

both involve fire and prayer

both involve fire and prayer

 

 

 

 

doorways into different worlds

doorways into different worlds

 

 

 

 

Part 5: The latest wave to arrive on the LES – the hipsters

Okay, they’re not exactly immigrants but they do have their own culture. Fortunately for older neighbourhoods like the LES it usually involves recycling vintage spaces into cafes and galleries rather than knocking them down altogether.

Unfortunately though, for the Chinese, the hipsters seem to be inadvertently pushing some of them out by pushing the rents up – I read about a building on Delancey where the long-term Chinese residents hated the hipsters for paying the higher rents and thereby endangering their affordable ones. 

 

 

the latest wave to hit the LES after the Chinese - the hipsters :: 1

the latest wave to hit the LES after the Chinese – the hipsters :: 1

 

 

 

 

the latest wave to hit the LES after the Chinese - the hipsters :: 2

the latest wave to hit the LES after the Chinese – the hipsters :: 2

 

 

 

 

recycled shirt shop - now a gallery

recycled shirt shop – now a gallery

 

 

 

 

Part 6: A little on the wild side

Starting with this one – note the gentleman on the left, a new cross-breed – the Chinese hipster.

 

 

Lower East wild Side - the dragon and the leopard

Lower East wild Side – the dragon and the leopard

 

 

 

 

Then there’s Shaggy, a curious canine we met on Clinton Street.

 

 

not only does Shaggy wear shoes

not only does Shaggy wear shoes

 

 

 

 

he also has a cap

he also has a cap

 

 

 

 

I'm guessing Shaggy doesn't eat dog food either

I’m guessing Shaggy doesn’t eat dog food either

 

 

 

 

And finally, two lions.

 

raaa! Shadow, you don't scare me

raaa! Shadow, you don’t scare me

 

 

 

 

Part 7: So is there a neighbourhood in the neighbourhood?

Probably not compared to the closely-knit, highly inter-dependent ones that have inhabited the LES over the last 200 years. But relative to other areas, I think so. I saw signs of it on benches that shop owners put out for the Puerto Rican oldies to pass their time on. On shared steps where people waited for their laundry.

 

 

a hat wearer from way back - Carlos

a hat wearer from way back – Carlos

 

 

 

 

proudly Puerto Rican - Carlos, chewing the fat with Luis

proudly Puerto Rican – Carlos, chewing the fat with Luis

 

 

 

 

waiting for laundry on Broome - Davi and Kumi

waiting for laundry on Broome – Davi and Kumi

 

 

 

 

And in the way the various groups work hard to keep their cultures alive, from the Jews and Chinese to the South Americans.

 

 

keeping different heritages alive

keeping different heritages alive

 

 

 

 

Speaking of Jewish tradition, I learned two new things this week – even if only your mother’s mother’s mother was Jewish, you’re Jewish, and that right now, Jews are celebrating their new year – L’shana Tova!

 

 

'even if only your mother's mother's mother was Jewish, you're Jewish'

‘even if only your mother’s mother’s mother was Jewish, you’re Jewish’

 

 

 

 

Happy New Year - may it be a sweet one

Happy New Year – may it be a sweet one

 

 

 

 

The Wrap

Despite my lack of energy this week, I enjoyed meandering around the LES. I so wish time-machines existed so I could hop in one and travel back to see just how crowded and crazy the neighbourhood used to be. Still, I feel grateful that I saw it when I did – who knows how long those last remnants of the past will be able to hang on for.

 

 

 

from east to west - Coco looking west over the Hudson

from east to west – Coco looking west over the Hudson

 

 

 

On the ‘home front’

As I said, I hit the wall this week – and Coco wasn’t helping. She loves NY but she also loves to regularly remind me what she’s missing: “I miss my friends, my family, my cats and my home.” I can’t argue with her – I miss all those too (especially the cat who is no longer – still haven’t told Coco). As amazing as this project has been and still is, it’s been the longest year – ever. Seriously, I feel like we’ve been away for years. And I’m running a month late so the earliest we’ll be home is late January!

To give us both a boost, Coco and I took the day off and went ‘out’ last Tuesday. We ate sushi and gluten-free cupcakes (Babycakes). We read books at my favourite bookstore in NY (Rizzoli). We broke my cardinal rule of not spending a cent on anything unnecessary and bought ‘stuff’ – me, MAC make-up (because in my fantasy world, I have the time and the patience to fiddle with all that), Coco, a pair of shiny black shoes (because in the real world she’s developed a love of everything fashion – she’s going to be an expensive teenager I can just tell).

We had fun. Except all that retail therapy made me even more worried about money than I already am. Oy vey!

This suburb has been brought to you by @JasonCupitt

 —

See you next Monday-ish.

 

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