39

Kyojima

K intro

 

I could use all kinds of long fancy words but it would all boil down to this – wow. Tokyo. Wow.

Having never been before I had little idea what to expect. I mean, sure, I’ve seen Lost in Translation too. Read some Murakami. Even done some origami in my time. But really, nothing prepared me for this.

After just over a week it’d be somewhat silly to make a grand pronouncement of exactly what makes Tokyo so interesting – but I’m in a silly mood so… You’re in Asia but it feels kind of European, it’s sophisticated but cartoony-madcap too, ancient but edgy, and while buzzy-exciting, there’s also a tremendous sense of calm.

There. Tokyo in a nutshell. The End.

Okay, no, now I really am being silly. Let’s get down to business.

For the first week here I wanted to find ‘old Tokyo’. But was it even possible? One mega earthquake and a world war had destroyed most of the old long ago. And if it did exist, where was it? In a city that makes Los Angeles look compact, I had no clue where to start.

Then I read about a festival celebrating traditional Edo culture that was happening on the weekend in a place called Asakusa. Went. Marvelled. But was disappointed. Impressive temple, grand parade but where was the patina?

Just across the river from Asakusa as it turned out. In an area that actually did survive both the earthquake and the bombs – Kyojima. So after spending half my time in Asakusa, we headed over there.

Some facts… Kyojima is in eastern Tokyo, in the historically working class ‘low city’ (shitamachi). Late 19th century, it still had paddy fields and marshes. After the great earthquake of 1923, masses of wooden ‘long houses’ were built without any planning to cater for those who’d lost their homes elsewhere. When most of Tokyo burnt to the ground in WWII, Kyojima again was spared – by the river and the railway line that acted as firebreaks – and even more people piled in.

So what’s it like today? Let’s go see…

 

Part 1: En route

It’s hard to follow one’s plan in Tokyo I’m finding. You set your course but then something crops up, and suddenly you’re heading down another road, literally.

Case in point – our first day in the area. As I mentioned, we started out by visiting Asakusa, right next door to Kyojima. I had planned to make a beeline for the big temple there but as soon as we exited the subway, Coco and I were thrown off course by two women in kimonos.

We’ve seen so many since then that I almost don’t have to stop and stare now – almost – but these first ones completely entranced me.

 

 

first sighting

first sighting

 

 

 

 

We followed them all the way to their destination – a shop that sold the traditional shoes they were wearing, geta. I ducked inside to ask if I could photograph them – without hesitation they agreed. And so ensued a little photo session…

 

 

the unveiling

the unveiling

 

 

 

 

Kaori

Kaori

 

 

 

 

glow

glow

 

 

 

 

Yumiko

Yumiko

 

 

 

 

ready for take-off

ready for take-off

 

 

 

 

We barely spoke a word but Kaori and Yumiko were both so patient and still. It was dreamlike and inspired some (bad) haiku…

 

 

The brown spot hopped off, And landed on her neck, It was happy there

The brown spot hopped off, And landed on her neck, It was happy there

 

 

 

 

The sound her Geta made, Clip clop clip clop clip clop, Her grandfather’s favourite

The sound her Geta made, Clip clop clip clop clip clop, Her grandfather’s favourite

 

 

 

 

The colour of her Tabi, Made her dream of Hanami, Drinking sake under sakura

The colour of her Tabi, Made her dream of Hanami, Drinking sake under sakura

 

 

 

 

After taking the photographs, they calmly went back inside to resume looking at the hanao, the little V-shaped straps that attach to the geta shoes.

 

 

hanao

hanao

 

 

 

 

endless variety :: 1

endless variety :: 1

 

 

 

 

endless variety :: 2

endless variety :: 2

 

 

 

 

I’d read somewhere that kimonos are enjoying a resurgence among younger women and was curious to know more. But unfortunately the language barrier prevented much chat. So I thanked them both profusely for their time and left. (And do you know, of all the kimonos we’ve seen in the past week, their two remain my favourite.)

 

 

sayonara Yumiko and Kaori

sayonara Yumiko and Kaori

 

 

 

 

Part 2: Still en route

Our next visit was also to Asakusa because at this stage I was still hoping to find the ‘old’ there. We only caught the tail end of the parade of traditional culture and costumes but found a few characters hanging around on the streets late afternoon, being madly photographed by the passing crowd.

 

 

what's so special about these geisha?

what’s so special about these geisha? :: 1

 

 

 

 

what's so special about these geisha? :: 2

what’s so special about these geisha? :: 2

 

 

 

 

they're men

they’re men

 

 

 

 

pretty men

pretty men

 

 

 

 

 

And then, more dress-ups…

 

 

dogs in kimonos being followed by ninjas with big hats?

dogs in kimonos being followed by ninjas in big hats?

 

 

 

 

The ‘ninjas’ were actually rickshaw drivers who whipped out cameras instead of nunchucks to snap the dogs because they were so kawaii – cute.

 

 

 

kawaii

kawaii :: 1

 

 

 

 

kawaii :: 2

kawaii :: 2

 

 

 

 

Part 3: Finally, Kyojima – and the search for the rare nagaya

By day three I’d worked out that Asakusa wasn’t floating my boat – but that just across the Sumida River was a neighbourhood called Kyojima that probably would. It was apparently one of the few traditional areas left in Tokyo, filled with old wooden ‘long houses’ called nagaya. Patina here we come!

First thing of note is that while Kyojima may be old, right next door is Tokyo’s latest, greatest – Skytree, the world’s tallest tower, opened just this year.

 

 

Kyojima, with Skytree in the background

Kyojima, with Skytree in the background

 

 

 

As we wandered around Kyojima’s maze-like alleys, filled with bicycles not cars, residents would ask: So you’re here to see Skytree? No, actually, we’re here to see you! You and your nagaya.

Of course, finding the old nagaya – which are basically three dwellings in one long structure – wasn’t as easy as I’d imagined. I later learned that over the last five to ten years a lot of them have been demolished, some because of the Skytree development itself. (Apparently a trusted community leader who supported the Skytree project was instrumental in getting others in Kyojima to sell their land to the developers. He moved to the 41st floor of one of the condominiums the Skytree people built, saying, “I’m going from a horizontal nagaya to a vertical nagaya”. )

Despite the scarcity of the nagaya, we managed to find a few. This one’s day must be numbered – it’s uninhabited and just standing.

 

 

nagaya - 'long house'

nagaya – ‘long house’

 

 

 

 

revival vs just surviving

revival vs just surviving

 

 

 

 

Around the corner we found a happier story, that of husband and wife Shiego and Fumiko Motosuna. Fumiko has lived in the small house they call home for 80 of her 82 years; Shiego, for their married life, all 54 years of it. Although Shiego at 83 is very fragile, he only needs to open his front door and take a few shuffling steps to sit in the sun and be part of the world.

As Coco and I were trying to communicate with the couple, their younger neighbour popped her head out, to give us the once over and then to help translate – I can only imagine how reassuring it must be for the older couple to have her and their other neighbours so close.

 

 

home for 80 of her 82 years - Fumiko with husband Shigeo

home for 80 of her 82 years – Fumiko with husband Shigeo

 

 

 

 

On another visit we met a Japanese father and son, Tak and Ken, out on a nagaya hunt themselves. They actually took us to the one below, where we ran into Mr Suzuki, a local restaurant owner who was picking up some dishes from the owners of the nagaya, having delivered the food a little earlier. No styrofoam or plastic here – and I love the ingenious system for transporting the tray of food on the back of the motorbike.

 

 

first he delivers, then he picks up - Mr Suzuki

first he delivers, then he picks up – Mr Suzuki

 

 

 

 

up, down

up, down

 

 

 

 

back to base

back to base

 

 

 

 

After Tak, Ken and Mr Suzuki had left, Coco and I stayed to have a nose around the nagaya.

 

 

the front door of No 36-8

the front door of No 36-8

 

 

 

 

a bonsai 'backyard'

a bonsai ‘backyard’

 

 

 

 

nature in the midst of urban

nature in the midst of urban

 

 

 

 

new neighbours

new neighbours

 

 

 

 

Part 4: Down the main street

I’d started to get a sense of the lovely community feel of Kyojima when we’d met Fumiko and Shigeo. But walking down the small shopping street, Tachibana Ginza, I really started to understand what was so special about this place – it felt like a small village despite being in the middle of the world’s largest metropolitan area. Virtually car-free, everyone on bikes, kids running around – and the friendliest shop keepers providing everything you needed for dinner.

 

 

rush hour on the main street, Tachibana Ginza

rush hour on the main street, Tachibana Ginza

 

 

 

 

keeping Kyojima in veggies - Yoshiko and Toshi

keeping Kyojima in veggies – Yoshiko and Toshi

 

 

 

 

Toshi and her kaki - Japanese Persimmon

Toshi and her kaki – Japanese Persimmon

 

 

 

 

when you've finished that, could you go to the shops and pick up some bread please

when you’ve finished that, could you go to the shops and pick up some bread please

 

 

 

 

the stuff of life - memories and bread

the stuff of life – memories and bread

 

 

 

 

Soda waiting for customers

Soda waiting for customers

 

 

 

 

tea and udon

tea and oden

 

 

 

 

 

I particularly liked Yumiko and her colourful shop selling takoyaki (octopus in batter) and taiyaki (red bean paste in batter). I couldn’t sample the wares (gluten) and Coco didn’t want to (scared), so I can’t tell you what they were like. But they looked pretty tasty.

 

 

aglow - Yumiko's fish cafe :: 1

aglow – Yumiko’s fish cafe :: 1

 

 

 

 

aglow - Yumiko's fish cafe :: 2

aglow – Yumiko’s fish cafe :: 2

 

 

 

 

Yumiko making taiyaki - fish shaped cake with red bean paste

Yumiko making taiyaki – fish shaped cake with red bean paste

 

 

 

 

ready to eat - taiyaki

ready to eat – taiyaki

 

 

 

 

And then there’s takoyaki – which sounds so much nicer than octopus balls…

 

 

Mr Yamamoto waits for his takoyaki - octopus balls

Mr Yamamoto waits for his takoyaki – octopus balls

 

 

 

 

takoyaki - octopus in batter

dinner?

 

 

 

 

The octopus inspired more (still bad) haiku…

 

 

Eight tentacles apiece, Like eight petals on her obi, Infinity rules

Eight arms apiece, Like eight petals on her obi, Infinity rules

 

 

 

 

They share nothing, But a predilection for dots, Is that not enough?

They share nothing, But a predilection for dots, Is that not enough?

 

 

 

 

Part 5: The future of Kyojima

As atmospheric as neighbourhoods like Kyojima are, many consider that they’re also a disaster waiting to happen – densely packed areas with narrow lanes that fire trucks and ambulances wouldn’t be able to squeeze through in the event of a major earthquake (predicted to strike Tokyo within 30 years).

After last year’s disastrous earthquake in northern Japan, the government is even more concerned and is looking closely at ways to reduce the risk – the nagaya surely would be the first to go.

I don’t know what’s more worrying, that or the fact that Japan has an extremely low birth rate and a rapidly aging population; I read somewhere that Tokyo’s population could halve in the next 90 years.

From what I could see Kyojima is at least doing its bit to repopulate Tokyo – there seemed to be kids everywhere. Like seven year old Himari, who was dressed for the ‘3-5-7 festival’ – Shichi-Go-San – where kids aged three, five and seven don traditional costume and visit temples and shrines.

 

 

7 year old Himari, dressed for the 3-5-7 festival - Shichi-Go-San

new life in Kyojima :: 1

 

 

 

 

new life in Kyojima :: 2

new life in Kyojima :: 2

 

 

 

 

And Hinata and Icho, playing what looked like hopscotch, minus any numbers.

 

 

hopscotch-ish - Hinata and Icho

hopscotch-ish – Hinata and Icho

 

 

 

 

And perhaps the newest member of Kyojima…

 

 

lunchtime - looking through the noren, doorway curtains

lunchtime – looking through the noren, doorway curtains

 

 

 

 

The Wrap

Maze-like, cramped and at major risk of fire damage from any future earthquakes it may be, but in a city as vast – and ‘new’ – as Tokyo, Kyojima is a wonderful thing, housing families who’ve lived here for generations in a tightly knit community. And I’m glad I got to see the nagaya – I’m not sure how much longer those dear old things can hang on for.

 

 

mesmerised

mesmerised

 

 

 

On the ‘home front’

Coco, being the easy-going, consistently happy, endlessly positive child that she is, has pretty much loved every city we’ve been to. But I think Tokyo is the one that will leave the greatest impression on her. We really haven’t seen much aside from Kyojima yet but already she’s smitten. She can’t get over the kimonos and the school uniforms and the way little kids travel on the subway by themselves. Or how kind and helpful the people are (aside from going out of their way to help us with directions, we were also invited to a small tea ceremony one day).

Then yesterday, as a bribe to do yet another few hours of exploring, I took her to a ‘cat cafe’ where people who can’t keep pets in their homes can hang out with 20+ felines. She loved it. Begged me to stay longer. Desperate to go back.

So that’s it. She’ll have travelled all around the world and people will ask, what was your favourite place. Paris, Rome, Disneyland?

Na, the cat cafe.

Ah well.

 —

This suburb has been brought to you by Di Quick

See you next week.

 

38

Limert Park

LP intro

 

Hey. Or should I say, konnichiha! Yes, we’re in Tokyo. Which I have to say is pretty damn exciting. But before I can leave our micro-sized apartment and launch myself on yet another unsuspecting populace (“You want to photograph my stockings?”) here’s the third and final LA story…

(Well, short story that is. I started late and finished early – and found the streets even more deserted of humankind than in the last two weeks. Grrr.)

Having ‘done’ Latino in week one and then artist/hipster last week, I wanted the final LA post to focus on a black neighbourhood. Which in LA means south – which in turn means potentially dodgy as. My inner thrill seeker was all, yeah, go to South Central (as in riots), go to Compton (as in hip hop NWA’s ‘Straight Outta Compton’).

But when I mentioned this to people, they’d be all, “honey, I’m black and I wouldn’t even go there”.

Bravely/stupidly I ignored their advice. But aside from snapping a few churches and a man called Clyde, I didn’t dally – not because I felt unsafe but because it was kind of nondescript.

I finally ended up just south-west of downtown LA in a black neighbourhood called Limert Park, the ‘centre of African-American culture’. While I completely failed to capture said culture in the five seconds I spent there, I did stumble on an interesting church congregation and a couple of cars…

 

Part 1: You gotta have faith

While I’m not religious, I do love a black church – like the one I met sweet Flossie at in NY.

So I went in search. Starting with a couple of tiny, almost hand-made looking churches in South Central…

 

 

hand-made churches, South Central :: 1

hand-made churches, South Central :: 1

 

 

 

 

hand-made churches, South Central :: 2

hand-made churches, South Central :: 2

 

 

 

Coco and I stuck our noses in the church above – where we met Tasha, below – before being given the third degree by one of the organisers. We were in South Central I guess…

 

 

Tasha inside God's Tabernacle of Faith

Tasha inside God’s Tabernacle of Faith

 

 

 

 

Then it was onto Limert Park. Third time lucky…

 

 

an unlikely looking church - Brenda, Casandra and Kelvin outside New Life Ministries

an unlikely looking church – Brenda, Casandra and Kelvin outside New Life Ministries

 

 

 

 

Unlike the two South Central churches we’d seen, New Life Ministries looked nothing like a house of worship. I would’ve driven straight past it in fact had it not been for the intensely bright LA sun, lighting up the canary yellow outfit worn by a member of the congregation, Casandra. This is what caught my eye…

 

 

lit up by the sun - Casandra

aglow – Casandra

 

 

 

 

I circled back, raced out of the car and found Casandra – “You, madam, are a vision. May I take your photograph?”

As I walked into the small room, I quickly realised Casandra wasn’t the only vision. Here was a handful of people who took their Sunday best seriously…

 

 

"We're part of the Pentecostal church"

“We like to dress up”

 

 

 

The colours and patterns were even more intense when they stood or sat near the door’s blinding light.

 

 

the big cheese - Bishop Hutchins

the big cheese – Bishop Hutchins

 

 

 

 

retired banker, furniture liquidator and entrepreneur - 66 year old Casandra

retired banker, furniture liquidator and entrepreneur – 66 year old Casandra

 

 

 

 The incredibly friendly and warm Casandra explained that for her, church was everything.

 

 

"God is first in my life"

“God is first in my life”

 

 

 

 I suspect dressing up comes a close second.

 

 

and the fashion

and the fashion

 

 

 

 

"You should see what I'm wearing to church on Friday night"

“You should see what I’m wearing to church on Friday night”

 

 

 

 

"We've been best friends for 17 years" - Casandra and Brenda

“We’ve been best friends for 17 years” – Casandra and Brenda

 

 

 

 

The church is small – around 20 people – but it appeared to have at least three preachers as well as the Bishop. But just because you’re a holy man doesn’t mean you can’t look sharp…

 

 

off to another church - preachers George, Al and Phillip

off to another church – preachers George, Al and Phillip

 

 

 

 

steppin' out

steppin’ out

 

 

 

 

peach

peach

 

 

 

 

As I was photographing the guys, Brenda wandered over to them and suddenly burst into song – with the most beautiful voice.

 

 

gospel on the sidewalk - Brenda :: 1

gospel on the sidewalk – Brenda :: 1

 

 

 

 

gospel on the sidewalk - Brenda :: 2

gospel on the sidewalk – Brenda :: 2

 

 

 

 

gospel on the sidewalk - Brenda :: 3

gospel on the sidewalk – Brenda :: 3

 

 

 

 

Part 2: Random people in Limert Park

Starting with HD and Ishonay. HD told me he was a famous rapper. He had me going until I questioned him again – “Nah, I’m at school, studying to be a psychiatrist.”

 

 

"I'm a famous rapper…. okay, not really" - HD and girlfriend, Ishonay

“I’m a famous rapper…. okay, not really” – HD and girlfriend, Ishonay

 

 

 

 

"I'm studying to be a social worker" - Ishonay

“I’m studying to be a social worker” – Ishonay

 

 

 

 

I don’t know why I asked them to put their foreheads together – but later that day, just around the corner from where I photographed the couple, I found a similar image…

 

 

union

union

 

 

 

 

On another visit I met a gaggle of girls, living around the corner from the main street in Limert Park.

 

 

playtime

playtime

 

 

 

 

"hurry up, I'm getting squashed!" - Amelia, Tatiana and Kimberly

“hurry up, I’m getting squashed!” – Amelia, Tatiana and Kimberly

 

 

 

 

Part 3: Classic cars

You gotta have wheels in LA. Even if they’re small…

 

 

"You married? I gotta find a good woman to help me spend my money" - Clyde

“You married? I gotta find a good woman to help me spend my money” – Clyde

 

 

 

 

"Come up and see me sometime, I live here, in this building"

“Come up and see me sometime, I live here, in this building”

 

 

 

 

On our last visit to the area, after meeting Casandra et al at the church, Coco and I wandered over to Limert Park just before sunset – only to find that the place was in full swing, with a market and drum circle in the neighbourhood park, and a line-up of classic cars across the road from there. Suddenly, after days of nothing happening and no-one around, there was too much to shoot – the light was about to go so I chose the cars. But as soon we got over there, the LAPD turned up and told the cars to stop clogging the street and move on. I had time to take two or three shots only. Blah!

Los Angeles – a much more interesting city than I’d imagined but a bugger to photograph.

 

 

cruisin' :: 1

cruisin’ :: 1

 

 

 

 

cruisin' :: 2

cruisin’ :: 2

 

 

 

 

"Move your cars now or they will be towed" - LAPD

“Move your cars now or they will be towed” – LAPD

 

 

 

 

LA passions

LA passions

 

 

 

 

Part 4: The woman in the red turban

So that was Limert Park. But before we leave the neighbourhood I want you meet one last person – 80-something Margaret. It was her red turban that first attracted me but it’ll be her blue eyes that I’ll always remember. That and her cussin’.

 

 

the red turban - Margaret

the red turban – Margaret

 

 

 

 

"I don't take no BS from no-one" - Margaret

“I don’t take no BS from no-one” – Margaret

 

 

 

 

dear Margaret, may a palm tree by the ocean come your way one day

dear Margaret, may a palm tree by the ocean come your way one day

 

 

 

 

The Wrap

As I said, it was a particularly short week which meant hardly any time at all to explore – I barely scratched the surface of Limert Park and wished I could’ve seen more. But I loved meeting Casandra and her congregation, as well as feisty Margaret. And those cars. Petrol guzzlers they may be but they are just so cool.

 

 

adios LA

adios LA

 

 

 

 

Coco and Casandra

Coco and Casandra

 

 

On the ‘home front’

When I arrived in LA, my opinion of the city was pretty low – a gateway to somewhere else much more appealing or a necessary stop-over on the way back to Australia. Three weeks later I’m starting to realise that it’s a city that requires much peeling back of its layers to reveal its full charms. LA – it’s not a dump (or the moon) – it’s an onion.

Many thanks to our friends, Fiona, Steve, Katie and Jacob. And to Esmeralda, our GPS – I’m not kidding when I say I could not have survived LA without you.

So, adios LA and konnichiha Tokyo! As soon as I hit ‘Publish’ on this post, Coco and I will be out the door. Having never been here before there is much to explore. I can’t wait to show you…

 —

This suburb has been brought to you by Shirl and Vaughan

See you next week.

 

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