49

Avondale

A intro

 

For the second and final Auckland post I did think I should probably balance the first Otara post – poorish and Polynesian – with one set in a suburb more affluent and white.

But when I read that 40% of Auckland’s population were born overseas and that according to a recent study by Statistics New Zealand, minority communities are almost certain to outnumber whities in Auckland in the next few years, I decided to choose a suburb that might be more reflective of Auckland’s future than its past – Avondale, west of the city centre.

Quick facts. Settled after the late 1850s when the Great North Road was built. Early industries included brickyards, tanneries and market gardens. Semi-famous for the ‘Avondale spider’, a huntsman spider from Australia, as well as Sunday produce and flea markets. Population wise, a real mix of people from all over the globe.

Let’s do it.

 

Part 1: At the local mosque

Wandering around the shops at Avondale I found a spice shop run by some Afghans. Was there a mosque nearby, I asked. Yes, just up the road, turn left, you can’t miss it, they said.

But I did almost miss it. Because Avondale’s mosque doesn’t look anything like a mosque – more like an oldish school hall without a minaret or dome in sight.

What was very mosque-like, however, were all the people piling into the unassuming building – Afghans, Indonesians, Indians and Somalians, all dressed in their traditional clothes. Swarthy men in white salwar kameez-type suits, caps and keffiyeh scarves. The women covered from head to toe. This was a mosque, no doubt about it.

 

 

the only domes at the Avondale mosque

the only domes at the Avondale mosque

 

 

 

 

a far cry from the mosques of his own country - Wasim, 18, from Afghanistan

a far cry from the mosques of his own country – Wasim, 18, from Afghanistan

 

 

 

 

and more recent ones - Nadia from Ethiopia

and more recent ones – Nadia from Ethiopia

 

 

 

 

the new Kiwi - Gul, originally from Afghanistan

the new Kiwi – Gul, originally from Afghanistan

 

 

 

 

from Afghanistan to Auckland - Hewad and Shahid

from Afghanistan to Auckland – Hewad and Shahid

 

 

 

 

Hewad

Hewad

 

 

 

 

flower girl - Hind from Uzbekistan

flower girl – Hind from Uzbekistan

 

 

 

 

the times of Muslim prayer are determined by the position of the sun

the times of Muslim prayer are determined by the position of the sun

 

 

 

 

Islam in the suburbs

Islam in the suburbs

 

 

 

 

Part 2: From Afghanistan and Uzbekistan to Bangladesh and India

The article I read about the impending shift from white to non-whites said that, between 1986 and 2006, “the numbers born in Asia and now resident in New Zealand increased by 661 per cent, with the Chinese (899.4 per cent) and Indians (841.6 per cent) dominating growth”.

While I certainly saw a huge number of Chinese at the Sunday Avondale markets, I didn’t see that many wandering around the suburb. I did, however, see a lot of people from the Indian subcontinent, including a lovely woman from Bangladesh and another from India. Did they like Auckland and were they fully accepted here? Yes and Yes.

 

 

then and now - Nazreen from Bangladesh

then and now – Nazreen from Bangladesh

 

 

 

 

Bangladeshi Nazreen at the spice shop run by Afghans

Bangladeshi Nazreen at the spice shop run by Afghans

 

 

 

 

successfully transplanted onto NZ soil

successfully transplanted onto NZ soil

 

 

 

 

and more recent ones - Saleha from Gujurat, India

and more recent ones – Saleha from Gujurat, India

 

 

 

With all these people continuing to arrive in NZ from all over the planet, I wondered what the original inhabitants thought – the Maori. Unfortunately I’m none the wiser – the only Maori I met in Avondale was a wonderful man called Jacques. His full face tattoo was so intriguing I completely forgot to ask his opinion on the subject. Instead we discussed his name – his mum named him after Jacques Cousteau because he was the guardian of the sea. Cool.

 

 

recent arrivals and the original ones

recent arrivals and the original ones

 

 

 

 

"I used to be a carver, now I' I'm a truck driver" - Jacques

“I used to be a carver, now I’m a truck driver” – Jacques

 

 

 

 

Part 3: Tonga

While the Chinese and Indians might be pouring into Auckland, the number of overseas-born Pacific people also doubled between 1986 and 2006.

Unlike Samoa which was once administered by New Zealand (1914 to 1962), the kingdom of Tonga, with its 176 islands, has always been independent.

Maybe that’s why the Tongans in Auckland always seem quite regal. Especially when they’re dressed for church, like the ones I met late on a Sunday in Avondale. They’d gathered after church for choir practice as well as a meeting of elders.

 

 

fusion :: 1

fusion :: 1

 

 

 

fusion :: 2

fusion :: 2

 

 

 

 

from the islands

from the islands :: 1

 

 

 

 

from the islands :: 2

from the islands :: 2

 

 

 

 

elders

elders

 

 

 

 

a colourful tale :: 1

a colourful tale :: 1

 

 

 

 

a colourful tale :: 2

a colourful tale :: 2

 

 

 

 

And those wraps around their waists? The women’s decorative waistband is called a kiekie, the men’s, a ta’uvala (which they wear over their tupenu, which is a wrap around skirt with pockets). Both are worn for church.

 

"we wear the skirts to show respect at church" :: 1

“we wear them to show respect at church” :: 1

 

 

 

 

"we wear the skirts to show respect at church" :: 2

“we wear them to show respect at church” :: 2

 

 

 

 

Not that Samoans don’t have a commanding, striking look about them. Check out Samoan John in his church threads, picking us some Chinese takeaway on one of the main shopping roads of Avondale.

 

 

half Western, half Samoan, picking up Chinese takeaway - John, grabbing lunch after church

half Western, half Samoan, picking up Chinese takeaway – John, grabbing lunch after church

 

 

 

 

The Wrap

Everyone I met this week smiled broadly when I asked them how they found their adopted home, Auckland. It reminded me of my travels around some of Sydney’s outer suburbs, where people from around the world are able to start new, productive lives.

Not that it’s all a bed of roses. But while racism and discrimination might exist in suburbs like Avondale, for many people, it’s still a better life than the one they left behind.

Speaking of leaving, we left Auckland on Tuesday, flying off just after sunrise. Peering through the window at the city below, the harbour a perfect sheen, I thought how sad it was that so many tourists would never venture beyond the showy bits, as impressive as they are. If only they shunned the harbour tour and headed inland, to suburbs like Otara and Avondale, they’d see a whole other side of the city. Possibly, dare I say it, a more interesting one.

 

 

 

adios Auckland

adios Auckland

 

 

 

 

aka ditch

aka ditch

 

 

 

 

then and now - Coco in front of a mural depicting old Avondale

then and now – Coco in front of a mural depicting old Avondale

 

 

 

 

island girl

island girl

 

 

 

 

On the ‘home front’

Coco and I want to say a huge thanks to our Auckland friends, Gay, Mark and Meisha. Not only for housing us these past few weeks, but for endlessly driving me around, feeding us every night, and taking Coco off my hands for most of the time. After a year of juggling this project with being a mum and provider of three meals a day, it was such a relief to have at least one of my jobs taken care of. Aside from that, Coco loved her stay with you guys – as well as beautiful Ruby (dog), Saba (cat) and Coco (cat!). You’re all wonderful!

We arrived in Melbourne yesterday and tomorrow we’ll launch into my first suburb here – suburb No 50. 50! Can you believe it?

 —

This suburb has been brought to you by Anna Steiner, Chloe and Monique Leung

See you next week.

 

48

Te Aro

TA intro

 

Having spent our first week in Auckland, I decided to check out the nation’s capital, Wellington, for this week’s post before finishing up our NZ stint back in Auckland next week.

Huh? Wouldn’t it have been more logical to do the other Auckland suburb before heading south? Well yes, but one look at the weather convinced me to leave pronto or suffer through the week of lousy weather that was forecast for Welly – because lousy weather, I was told, was something Wellington excelled at.

So, from a city with a population of 1.4 million to one with less than 400,000. Accordingly we only spent three days there – surely such a small city would only need a small amount of time to digest. But the “coolest little capital in the world” (according to Lonely Planet) punches above its weight – I left feeling like I needed at least another week there.

I chose a suburb close to the city centre because, like Auckland, most of Wellington was on holiday; if I had any chance of finding people to photograph, it would be in a ‘busy’ area like Te Aro.

No such luck. Te Aro was approaching busy for one of the days I was there but the rest of the time, deserted.

Super quick history… Used to be dodgy in certain bits, now the city’s alternative end, filled with vintage shops, cafes and apartment buildings.

Okay, hold on to your hat and let’s go Te Aro!

 

Part 1: Windy Welly

The adventure started before we even set foot in the place. Well known for being one of the windiest cities on the planet, the morning our Airbus A320 curved around on its final approach to Wellington Airport it was bright and sunny but blowing one hell of a gale. So bad the captain aborted his first attempt at a landing – not far from the ground, he hit the throttle and we felt the plane suddenly lurch heavenwards once more.

Looking down from the plane’s window at choppy Cook Strait was initially exciting – but after the aborted landing, all I could think was, I really don’t want Coco and I to end up in the drink. Normally one to enjoy the cheap thrill of air turbulence, I found myself desperately trying to tune out – but failing, as the plane shuddered and shook, fighting to stay level and making the eeriest noises imaginable.

On his second attempt, Captain Wonderful went for it – and this time managed to beat the notorious cross-winds, avoid the hills and bring the Airbus safely back to earth on the unbelievably short landing strip.

It was like nothing I’d ever experienced – which was exactly what another passenger told the local TV news crew who gathered around us as we disembarked, there to capture the dramatic landings of the day.

Welcome to windy Welly. Very bloody windy Welly.

 

 

white horses gallop through Cook Strait

white horses gallop through Cook Strait

 

 

 

 

sea dwellers

sea dwellers

 

 

 

 

The reason for the super windy city? Wellington sits in a major wind tunnel, created by the mountains on either side of Cook Strait – as the winds pass through the gap they pick up speed and strength.

 

 

mountainous terrain

mountainous terrain

 

 

 

 

windy Welly

windy Welly

 

 

 

 

chur bro, this place is windy eh? :: 1

chur bro, this place is windy eh? :: 1

 

 

 

 

chur bro, this place is windy eh? :: 2

chur bro, this place is windy eh? :: 2

 

 

 

 

chur bro, this place is windy eh? :: 4

chur bro, this place is windy eh? :: 3

 

 

 

 

Part 2: Vintage

The main heart of Te Aro is Cuba Street, where every second shop seems to be about one of two things – vintage clothes or caffeine.

Beginning with the vintage…

 

 

plenty of vintage, including the buildings

plenty of vintage, including the buildings

 

 

 

 

retro and recycled rules

retro and recycled rules

 

 

 

The first person I met on Cuba Street was Cian, a “fashion designer in the making” with a Boy George inspired look. While Cian reckoned Wellington was the most liberal city in New Zealand, he still felt “tolerated but not accepted” – “Yeah, I get called a faggot sometimes.”

 

 

"I feel tolerated not accepted" - Cian

“I feel tolerated not accepted” – Cian

 

 

 

 

black and white

black and white

 

 

 

 

Next was Grace, with her skater boyfriend, Fuzz. For them, Wellington was the only place to be in NZ – “If there wasn’t a Wellington in New Zealand, we’d move to Melbourne”. Why the Wellington love? “It’s artsy, cosy, fun. You’re free here, to be yourself”. And why Melbourne? “We’ve heard it’s like a giant Wellington.”

 

 

freedom - Grace

freedom – Grace

 

 

 

While there were a fair amount of black-clad bods wandering around, Te Aro also struck me as particularly colourful.

 

 

orange

orange

 

 

 

 

sea green

sea green

 

 

 

 

violet

violet

 

 

 

 

blue

blue

 

 

 

 

pink

pink

 

 

 

 

Part 3: Coffee culture

Apparently Wellington has ‘more bars, cafes and restaurants per capita than New York’. For once, I believe them. Whoever they are.

It also appeared to have less Starbucks per capita than any other city I’ve visited – these cafes are independently owned, by people who are passionate about beans and brews.

 

 

coffee culture on Cuba

coffee culture on Cuba

 

 

 

 

coffee everything

coffee everything

 

 

 

 

neighbours - coffee and books

neighbours – coffee and books

 

 

 

 

blown away - barista Drew

blown away – barista Drew from Milk Crate

 

 

 

 

coffee, past and present- barista Chris from Flight Coffee Hangar

coffee, past and present – barista Chris from Flight Coffee Hangar

 

 

 

 

eat and drink street

eat and drink street

 

 

 

 

Part 4: Wild Wellington

If I’d stayed another week, I would’ve shot a suburb that showed off Wellington’s wonderfully wild side – but as it is, here’s a few pics of a beautiful Bengal cat I met lurking around the place and the painted calves of a local called Steve.

 

 

wild Wellington

wild Wellington

 

 

 

 

watching the birdies

watching the birdies

 

 

 

 

"They're Day of the Dead tattoos with a NZ twist, representing me and my wife" - Steve

“They’re Day of the Dead tattoos with a NZ twist, representing me and my wife” – Steve

 

 

 

 

The Wrap

I would love to have seen Wellington in full swing, rather than half deserted. But even so, I loved it. In the way you can get your fix of alternative-urban in Te Aro and then head for the hills – and leave the city behind in no time at all. And as much as it might annoy, I found the wild wind incredibly invigorating. Except of course when you’re in a flying tin can, attempting to land. Then it’s just slightly terrifying. 

 

 

 

 

flying back to her adopted home, Auckland - Elizabeth, originally from Samoa

flying back to her adopted home, Auckland – Elizabeth, originally from Samoa

 

 

 

 

On the ‘home front’

Once again Coco was largely taken off my hands this week by our Auckland friend, Gay, who travelled down to Wellington with us, and whose family we stayed with while we were there (many thanks to all the Miers’). So while I was nosing around Te Aro, Coco was off playing tourist – and loving it.

We’re back in Auckland for one more week before flying off to our very last city on 52 Suburbs Around the World – Melbourne, Australia. With only four more posts to go now, I’m starting to feel sad and excited in equal measure. This has been a constant for so long now, I can’t imagine what it’s going to feel like without it.

 —

This suburb has been brought to you by Linda Ottery

See you next week.

 

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