China lite

from Beijing to Shanghai

 

Hello! Long time no speak. Almost a year in fact. Not good! So I finally made time this week to play with some pics from a brief trip Coco and I did earlier in the year to China.

It was a quick flit across the oceans for Coco to see her dad (based in Beijing) and then a few days just her and me in Shanghai.

Despite the fact I grew up in Hong Kong, I’d never been to China (it was closed back then – yes, that long ago…). So instead of doing my usual avoid-the-icons thing, I played tourist and hit the big ticket items.

You could spend lifetimes exploring China so a few days was no time at all. And I wasn’t really in matching-up-pairs or diptych mode when I was shooting. But months later, looking at the images again, I’ve managed to marry up some pairs.

Let’s go China!

Part 1: Beijing

Over the course of a few days I visited the Forbidden City, a few hutongs and my favourite – the Yonghe Lama Temple.

Starting with a shot of the military in front of the Forbidden City. I clicked the camera just as I heard “NO PHOTOS!” Alas, the shot was already taken…

 

forbidden shot in the Forbidden City

forbidden shot in the Forbidden City

 

 

 

 

at play vs on guard

at play vs on guard

 

 

 

 

so clean

surprisingly clean

 

 

 

Next, the hutongs, which are charming old alleys with small courtyard homes (siheyuan) running off them, that are fast disappearing.

 

hutong life

hutong life

 

 

 

 

home pride

home pride

 

 

 

 

hutongs, under grey then blue heavens

hutongs, under grey then blue heavens

 

 

 

 

guard dog

guard dog

 

 

 

 

dining under open heavens in the hutongs

al fresco dining in the hutongs

 

 

 

 

See that beautiful blue sky by the way? That’s one of the surprises of China, that you expect the air to live up to its terrible reputation all the time. Often it was brilliant blue. Then just as you were getting used to breathing without wincing, the smog (‘fog’) would roll in…

 

from on high – all the better to see the smog

from on high – all the better to see the smog

 

 

 

I loved nosing around the hutongs, but my favourite site in Beijing was the Yonghe Lama Temple. The incense, the gorgeous old buildings, and a woman wearing a flower print skirt and cropped yellow jacket…

 

a young crowd in an ancient setting – Yonghe Lama Temple :: 1

a young crowd in an ancient setting – Yonghe Lama Temple :: 1

 

 

 

 

a young crowd in an ancient setting – Yonghe Lama Temple :: 2

a young crowd in an ancient setting – Yonghe Lama Temple :: 2

 

 

 

 

sacred screens

sacred screens

 

 

 

 

sacred study

sacred study

 

 

 

Okay, so see that lady with the yellow jacket? I thought she had a great look, especially wondering around this beautiful temple, so I kind of stalked her. For a bit. Okay, a while.

 

flower girl

flower girl

 

 

 

 

stalking the flower girl :: 1

stalking flower girl

 

 

 

 

farewell flower girl, sorry about stalking you

farewell flower girl, sorry about stalking you

 

 

Last but not least, there was ‘tracksuit man’, from another major site, the Summer Palace.

 

tracksuit man

tracksuit man

 

 

Part 2: The Great Wall of China – no pics of that but some lovely blossom instead

Yep. I didn’t take my DSLR camera with me the day we visited one of the wonders of the world. Not sure why. Anyway, here are a few pics of some beautiful blossom snapped near the Wall.

 

nature, inside and out

nature, inside and out

 

 

 

 

pink flowers – from Beijing to bush

pink flowers – from Beijing to bush

 

 

 

 

Li Jing longed for her home in the country

Li Jing longed for her home in the country

 

 

 

And I treated myself to a night at the Brickyard, a boutique hotel with a view of the Wall. (Promise if I ever go again, I’ll snap that Wall!)

 

selfie

selfies, sort of

 

 

 

Part 3: Onto Shanghai

So so different to Beijing.

 

from little red book to little red bag

from little red book to little red bag

 

 

 

 

it was obvious where the designer had got his inspiration from

it was obvious where the designer had got his inspiration from

 

 

 

 

bikes still rule

bikes still rule in the French Quarter

 

 

We splurged and stayed at the amazing Peace Hotel for a few nights, an art deco beauty right on the Bund.

 

Coco outside the Peace Hotel

Coco outside the Peace Hotel

 

Early Sunday morning, while Coco slept, I snuck out of the hotel and had a lot of fun near the famous waterfront, the Bund – with hardly anyone around except men on bikes with dogs and a 96 year old quietly busting some moves.

 

 

Sunday in Shanghai :: 2

Sunday in Shanghai :: 1

 

 

 

 

Sunday in Shanghai :: 2

Sunday in Shanghai :: 2

 

 

 

 

busting moves on the Bund :: 1

busting moves on the Bund :: 1

 

 

 

 

busting moves on the Bund :: 2

busting moves on the Bund :: 2

 

 

 

People line up along the Bund to take selfies against the backdrop of the skyscraper district, Pudong. I realise people take selfies all over the world, but there were so many being taken, it made me think about the selfie and how strange or funny it is to watch people taking them.

 

selfies on the Bund

selfies on the Bund

 

 

 

 

they worship different things

they worship different things

 

 

 

 

The contrast between the historic Bund and shiny new Pudong is quite something. But what won me over in Shanghai was the Old Town. The chaos, friendly people and bucket loads of strange yet somehow alluring fluro meat on sticks.

 

Old Town, Shanghai

Old Town, Shanghai

 

 

 

 

Wang Wei worked, dreaming of his dinner

Wang Wei worked, dreaming of his dinner

 

 

 

The Old Town isn’t that far from the Bund and its upmarket art deco darlings, but it’s worlds apart.

 

upstairs downstairs :: 1

upstairs downstairs :: 1

 

 

 

 

upstairs downstairs :: 2

upstairs downstairs :: 2

 

 

 

And there endeth our chop chop trip to China. Short but very sweet. Hope you enjoyed it.

 

50

Footscray

F intro

 

Welcome to Melbourne, a city I’ve never spent more than a few days in or explored beyond the obvious – Fitzroy, St Kilda, that sort of thing. And anyway, that was eons ago, when Fitzroy was the latest hip thing and Chapel Street was still cool.

What was it like nowadays I wondered – and so here we are, city No 13 on 52 Suburbs Around the World.

I’d planned to spend longer but the way things have worked out means that we’ll only be here for two weeks, which, considering the size (four million-ish) and diversity of Melbourne is really not enough to do the city justice. But I need to get Coco back to school (she’s already missing the first week or so) and so two suburbs it will have to be.

For the first of those two suburbs I ended up choosing one that quite a few people suggested on my Facebook page – Footscray, five kilometres west of the city.

Some fast facts… Aboriginal forever until 1803 when the first European stepped foot in the area. Declared a municipality in 1859 with a population of 300 and 70 buildings. Industrial from mid-1800s until the 1960s and 70s when it began to decline. Central Footscray is now one of the main shopping and transport hubs for Melbourne’s western suburbs. Once very European, today the suburb is mainly Asian and African.

Ready?

 

Part 1: Footscray in a former life

Once upon a time the Footscray shopping strip was a little Europe, with Greeks, Italians and Yugoslavians filling the place. Times have clearly changed – I think I counted just three Italian establishments and not even one Greek joint. But I did find a Greek Orthodox Church and a wonderful Italian pasticceria dishing out some of the best cannoli in Melbourne.

 

 

old Footscray - Heidi at the Greek Orthodox church

old Footscray – Heidi at the Greek Orthodox church

 

 

 

 

Standing outside the Italian pasticceria, T Cavallaro and Sons, that’s been fattening up the suburb for more than 50 years, I met Ben and Matthew, 10 year old twins from an Italian background. They were in Footscray with their parents to pick up a cake for the 50th wedding anniversary of their nonna and nonno.

 

 

double-take - redheads in Footscray

double-take – redheads in Footscray :: 1

 

 

 

 

Ben and Matthew, 10, from an Italian background, picking up a cake for the 50th wedding anniversary of their nonna and nonno

double-take – redheads in Footscray :: 2

 

 

 

 

Apparently the pasticceria’s cannoli also draw crowds from all around with their creamy, thick, thigh-expanding deliciousness.

 

 

the best in town - cannelloni from T Cavallaro and Sons

the best in town – cannoli from T Cavallaro and Sons

 

 

 

 

Sitting at one of the cafes along a street that’s now dominated mainly by East African men, I caught sight of something else very European – a beret sitting atop the head of 77 year old Elias, originally from Bosnia.

 

 

Elias, 77, from Bosnia - "Where have I lived in Melbourne? Richmond and Footscray"

Elias, 77, from Bosnia – “Where have I lived in Melbourne? Richmond, Footscray, lots of places”

 

 

 

 

In search of more Greeks or Italians, I headed to Yarraville, just down the road from Footscray, where I found a Greek christening taking place.

 

 

"There's a few of us still here in Yarraville" - a Greek Christening

“There’s a few of us still here in Yarraville” – a Greek Christening

 

 

 

 

Zoe at her cousin's Christening at a Greek Orthodox church, Yarraville

Zoe at her cousin’s Christening at a Greek Orthodox church, Yarraville

 

 

 

 

But that was about it for signs of the old European Footscray – today it’s quite a different story…

 

 

Part 2: Footscray today

Or Footscary as some people refer to it thanks to the crime and drug problems it once faced and still faces to some extent.

Locals told me that 15 years ago the whole area, from Footscray to Yarraville, was down at heel and druggy. “If you got off at Yarraville train station, or Seddon, or Footscray, you’d be offered drugs”, was what I kept hearing.

Since then Yarraville cleaned up its act and is now fully gentrified. And Seddon, which is much closer to Footscray – in fact, is actually considered a part of Footscray – looks pretty glam too.

But Footscray itself, especially around the shopping centre, is still yet ‘to go’ – as one lady said, “The trendies haven’t made it here yet thank god”. Instead, it’s populated largely by immigrants – Vietnamese, Chinese and, more recently, East Africans.

Having said that, there is one part of the suburb, along the Maribyrnong River, that’s been designated an arts precinct. One moment you’re in highly multicultural Footscray, the next you’re looking over the river, latte in hand from the Happy River Cafe, before taking a round of the Footscray Community Arts Centre.

 

 

Footscray today - at one end, artsy, the other, Asian

Footscray today – at one end, artsy, the other, Asian

 

 

 

 

Danny and Jo, from China

Danny and Jo, from China

 

 

 

 

"We live here because of the markets and the fact it's so close to the city"

“We live here because of the markets and the fact it’s so close to the city”

 

 

 

 

the latest strangers to be welcomed into Footscray - Africans

the latest strangers to be welcomed into Footscray – Africans

 

 

 

 

transplanted traditions - "It takes six hours for them to do my hair like this and it lasts four months" - Daruka from Sudan

transplanted traditions – “It takes six hours for them to do my hair like this” – Daruka from Sudan

 

 

 

 

African Town

African Town

 

 

 

 

Ngor, 6, from the recently created South Sudan

Ngor, 6, from the recently created South Sudan

 

 

 

Medina from Ethiopia

Medina from Ethiopia

 

 

 

 

growing up Aussie - Medina's daughter, Hawi

growing up Aussie – Medina’s daughter, Hawi

 

 

 

 

Part 3: Arty Footscray

I was checking out the ‘legendary’ Olympic Donuts stand near the station one day when a young African woman in jeans and boots stopped by for a bag of the sugary goodness – after spending days watching the Sudanese, Somali and Ethiopian women go about their business in their traditional dress (most of whom refused to be photographed, drat it) I was curious.

Turned out that Duaa, a 22 year old recent RMIT graduate, was from an Eritrean background but had been born in Melbourne, in nearby Yarraville.

She explained that she now lived a little further west but had just started renting a studio in Footscray to do her art in.

For her, being a “hybrid” as she called it wasn’t confusing or difficult, but something she enjoyed.

And she loved Footscray for its cultural diversity and edge – and cheap rent.

 

 

Duaa, 22, born and bred in Western Melbourne by parents from Eritrea

“I like being a hybrid, it’s normal now in this country” – Duaa

 

 

 

 

Given her studio’s address – in one of the dodgiest bits of Footscray, near where a handful of druggies hang around every day – the rent was attractively cheap. And the colourful graphics painted along the laneway were doing their best to uplift. But still, you couldn’t help looking over your shoulder once or twice.

 

 

outside her studio

“My family wasn’t thrilled when I told them where my studio was” – Duaa, outside her studio

 

 

 

 

"I like being a hybrid of Eritrean and Australian, it's normal now in this country"

“I don’t want to be famous, I just want to make art that’s considered significant in some way”

 

 

 

 

"If I work late, I always check to see who's hanging around downstairs before I go - it can be a little scary at times"

“If I work late, I always check to see who’s hanging around downstairs before I go – it can be a little scary”

 

 

 

 

Part 4: West Footscray

Technically a separate suburb but one that I strayed into without realising I’d actually left Footscray proper. And interesting because this is where the Indian part of Footscray is, as well as the latest wave of new arrivals – whities. Or as someone I met who lived there said, “West Footscray is where people from Elwood (an eastern suburb) come to breed”.

 

 

Kalpita and Priyanka, in West Footscray for an Indian friend's child's birthday party

Kalpita and Priyanka, in West Footscray for an Indian friend’s child’s birthday party

 

 

 

 

India

India

 

 

 

 

twirls - candles from the Macedonian church and Priyanka's dress

twirls – candles from the Macedonian church and Priyanka’s dress

 

 

 

 

the most recent arrivals - whities - Matt with son Euan, 9, bought in West Footscray 3 years ago

the most recent arrivals – whities – Matt with son Euan, 9, bought in West Footscray 3 years ago

 

 

 

 

West Footscray - recently turned homely

West Footscray – recently turned homely :: 1

 

 

 

 

West Footscray - recently turned homely :: 2

West Footscray – recently turned homely :: 2

 

 

 

 

patriotism in the burbs - Australia Day, West Footscray

patriotism in the burbs – Australia Day, West Footscray

 

 

 

 

Part 5: And then I met…

Driving along the main road in West Footscray one day, I noticed men in stetsons standing outside ‘501 Receptions’. Texans? Mexicans? I circled back and went inside the building to find a wedding in full swing. But they weren’t Texans or Mexicans – these were gypsies.

My delight at crashing a gypsy wedding was, however, short-lived. I’d only taken a few shots when a tough looking broad – and she can only be described as a broad – suddenly swooped on me and ordered me to leave. Why I do not know – gypsies have a long history of being misrepresented but I’d already asked permission and been warmly welcomed by everyone, including the mothers of both the groom and the bride who were perfectly happy to let me take photographs.

After all the refusals by the African men and women earlier in the week, it was incredibly frustrating – there were some amazing looking people in the room and I was so curious to learn more.

What made it worse was the way the woman did it – I mean, sure, ask me to leave nicely – but don’t march me out like a child.

So I acted like a child and snuck in another few shots while she wasn’t looking – of a man who turned out to be the proud son of Ruby Sterio, the Queen of Gypsies and part of the famous Sterio gypsy family. Then I left.

 

 

Bill, father of the groom

Bill, father of the groom

 

 

 

 

"We live in a caravan and move all the time" 1

“We live in a caravan and move all the time” :: 1

 

 

 

 

"We live in a caravan and move all the time" :: 2

“We live in a caravan and move all the time” :: 2

 

 

 

 

free as a gypsy

free as a gypsy

 

 

 

 

wild west

wild west indeed

 

 

 

Driving around after I’d left the gypsies, I turned a random corner to find yet another unexpected sight – a large Buddhist temple in the midst of normal suburban homes.

Fearing the place was empty, I climbed the stairs and peered through the gap in the large front door to see and hear two Buddhist nuns praying.

After the experience with the aggressive woman at the gypsy wedding, I sat happily, listening to the soothing prayers until the nuns had finished. Then I asked if I could photograph them – and hallelujah, they said yes. And they stood, and they stood, and they stood, until I’d done what I needed to do. They giggled, I laughed, we all smiled.

 

 

 

prayer time

prayer time

 

 

 

 

zen in West Footscray -Vietnamese Buddhist Church, Phat Quang Pagoda

zen in West Footscray -Vietnamese Buddhist Church, Phat Quang Pagoda

 

 

 

 

they pray for "world peace and people's happiness" :: 1

they pray for “world peace and people’s happiness” :: 1

 

 

 

 

they pray for "world peace and people's happiness" :: 2

they pray for “world peace and people’s happiness” :: 2

 

 

 

 

a different world

a different world

 

 

 

 

from Yarraville to West Footscray

from Yarraville to West Footscray

 

 

 

 

old and new Australia

old and new Australia

 

 

 

 

The Wrap

The diversity in Footscray isn’t limited to the various nationalities and cultures. It’s also incredibly diverse in its land use and the way it changes so quickly from one thing to another. 

For example, down near the river there’s the Community Arts Centre and cool cafe (where the annual Laneway Festival kicks off this weekend) which are right opposite an old factory where blokes like Tony, Lance and Brendan work, waiting for that inevitable day when their factory gets ‘recycled’ into fancy apartments – “In three years we’ll be gone for sure”.

 

 

great views for a factory - Tony, Lance and Brendan at the Ryco hydraulic factory - "In three years this'll be fancy apartments for sure"

great views for a factory – Tony, Lance and Brendan at the Ryco hydraulic factory

 

 

 

 

Then up near the Footscray shops, there’s Asia and Africa – as well as myriad churches catering for the various different communities.

 

 

church land

church land

 

 

 

But as soon as you hit Seddon, which is five seconds down the road, it’s vintage shops like The Diamond Dog, run by the wonderful Sally, and hip cafes.

 

 

from Vietnam to vintage

from Vietnam to vintage

 

 

 

 

playing dress up just down the road in Seddon and Yarraville

playing dress up just down the road in Seddon and Yarraville

 

 

And there’s more change in store – Footscray has been designated a key growth area for Melbourne and the government has big plans for it. But even without that, given the way the surrounding areas have gentrified, maybe Footscray would end up going that way too. In short, go see it now – before the “trendies” get to it.

 

 

On the ‘home front’

Like Auckland, we’re lucky enough to be staying with friends here. So like Auckland, Coco sat this one out too. But here’s a shot of her with two Swedish girls at St kilda Library who we met on our way to buy groceries one day.

 

 

Coco and the Swedish girls

Coco and the Swedish girls

 

 

 

As I mentioned, some time next week – probably mid-week given I have yet to start shooting the second Melbourne suburb – Coco will pull on heavy black shoes and a green tartan uniform, and for the first time in over a year, do that most normal of things – go to school.

I asked her how she felt about it, after such a long time away – “Well I’m excited but a little nervous”. Fair enough, I thought, I am too.

 —

This suburb has been brought to you by Bronwyn Evans

See you next week – for the penultimate post.

 

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